Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Great Read about Life, Love, and Therapy

In 2019 it seems that everyone is talking to someone, and, with an overall influx of anxiety and a focus on mental health, openly speaking about therapy is more commonplace than it ever has been. But, talking about our issues and emotions has never been easy. Lori Gottlieb explores this through her own experiences as both patient and therapist in Maybe You Should Talk to Someone. The memoir follows her life and the choices that led her to what she describes as a very rewarding career as a therapist.

She details her relationship with clients who present various problems. There is John, a seemingly curmudgeonly man who works on a very popular TV show. Even John is hiding painful pasts and emotions that are brought out in sessions. Then there’s Julie, a college professor coming to terms with her cancer diagnosis. Lori explains the nuances of relationship between client and therapist, and even what to do in cases of seeing someone in public.

Lori details her experiences both as therapist and as a patient with the therapist she coins “Wendell”. Lori decides to go to therapy after a shocking and unexpected breakup that leaves her anxious and constantly teary. Wendell helps Lori to unpack and rethink her thoughts about her ex, herself, and her child. Along the way, you learn about Lori’s life and about the history and methodology of psychotherapy.

I really enjoyed this read, and it provided a humorous, personable look into the histories that bring people into therapy. I think that it demystified the practice, and hopefully inspires more people to “talk to someone”.

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Stay Happy and Healthy in the Cold

Shorter days and colder weather can weaken your immune system. It can be difficult to find the motivation to exercise when busy with holiday preparations and stuck in freezing weather. But there are important steps you must take to protect yourself in the cold winter months. The follow tips are important to follow when taking care of both your physical and mental health.

Avoid overeating: Healthy eating is important year-round. In the winter season, don’t go for a lot of carbs, though they may be calling out to you. Instead, make sure to instead eat a lot of protein. Add omega-3 fatty acids, which are helpful to prevent depression and inflammation. This can come from either supplements or fatty fish like salmon. Make sure to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables to ensure  that you are getting the correct amounts of nutrients. 

Exercise: When exercising, make a plan for the week and stick to it to ensure that you are getting in the correct amount and not straying from your plan. Or find ways to get your workouts in at home using youtube videos or home equipment. 

Wash your hands regularly. This is an important step to protect yourself from spreading sickness and infection.

Getting Warm in a sauna or heat room can also prove helpful to depression. 

Take your vitamins: Vitamin C and vitamin D are both important drugs to take to ward off colds and improve mood. Many of us lack vitamin in the winter, when it is more difficult to get natural light.

Go to bed as early as possible, get as much sleep as possible

Take time for yourself: Winter is full of get togethers with family and friends that are sure to bring on stressful conflicts and situations. Make sure to take a step back and find alone time to counter whatever is going on. 

Yes, still go outside: Bundle up and go for a walk or hike around your neighborhood to get some natural light and fresh air. 

Warm beverages: Get some warmth in yourself through liquids like tea and hot chocolate, but be sure to avoid caffeine after noon. 

Get a Mood Lamp: SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) impacts more people than you are aware of, especially if you live in an area of the world that gets a low amount of sunlight during the winter months. I have been using a mood lamp each morning while I knit and watch TV as a means to get in my sun in any way. 

Layers, Sweaters: Make sure to dress for the weather. Thick socks, sturdy boots, and thick sweaters are important staples of this season. 

Stay social: It’s easy to isolate yourself when it starts to get cold out. Instead, find time to invite friends over for warm drinks and movies or games. 

Are there any other ways you stay healthy in the winter? Let me know in the comments.